Relocating Your Elderly Parents

Senior Living Decisions

Relocating your elderly parents can be extremely difficult for you and your parents. Before you start your search, it’s a good idea to have in mind a few questions that will help you determine if a nursing home is right for your parent. For example, what type of care does your parent need? Are there specific amenities you would like included in your loved one’s residence? Do they offer respite care or short-term stays, and if so, is it enough time? What are their ratings? Is their staff experienced and compassionate towards dementia patients?

Tips For Finding the Right Nursing Home

Before you start your search, it’s a good idea to have in mind a few questions that will help you determine if relocating your elderly parents to a nursing home is right for your parent. For example, what type of care does your parent need? Are there specific amenities you would like included in your loved one’s residence? Do they offer respite care or short-term stays, and if so, is it enough time? What are their ratings? Is their staff experienced and compassionate towards dementia patients?

How to Pay for Senior Living

There are many ways seniors pay for senior living — Social Security, pensions, personal savings, and more — but there are also countless expenses with relocating your elderly parents into assisted living. Selling your parent's house, though heartbreaking, is a good way to pay for assisted living facilities. Consider downsizing, which may be an option for other family members as well. 

Weighing Options When Relocating your Elderly Parents

While your parent's health, happiness, and mobility are your top priority when choosing a nursing home, you should also consider downsizing options for your other parent. If they’re still capable of living alone, there may be downsizing options available in their area that would make sense for them.

Benefits of Downsizing to a Smaller Home

Apart from having extra money for expenses, there are several reasons your other parent might appreciate moving to a smaller residence. There may be medical reasons for downsizing, such as needing access to better medical care or closer proximity to hospital services. Your parent may also wish to live closer to family members, reducing travel time and expenses associated with visiting loved ones. It could also be that they want more independence, and a smaller home will enable them to take on more responsibilities.

When it's time to sell the property, it might need prepping before you can list it. That can include completing any necessary modifications and repairs. For example, leaking pipes and cracked windows should be fixed before listing the home for sale because they can be a major turnoff for potential purchasers.

Staying Compassionate During the Process

It can be painful to make these decisions but don’t forget it’s hard for your parents, too. Even if you all agree that one of them should move into a nursing home and one of them stays put, it will be an adjustment for everyone involved. If possible, find a way to make this process easier for your loved ones.

Your Parents' Best Interests

With their guidance, you can help your parents decide if an assisted living facility or independent living environment is right for them. Assisted living professionals will also be able to guide you through these decisions in ways that support your parent's best interests.


Visit Guide to Elder Care for resources to help navigate your parent's care options.


Millie Jones